Movie Review – Malang

Movie review by Rishi Kapoor

A thriller which I wanted to watch ever since I have seen the kisckass trailer ( it’s too impressive).I was wondering if the film could have been equally interesting like the way the promo was cut. Movie has the right dose of action , romance and bit of suspense but what it lacks is a water tight script.

Story Is set in Goa, the film shows Advait Thakur (Aditya) and Sara (Disha) meeting at a rave party and instantly falling in love. Advait is a shy guy from Mumbai while Sara is a footloose woman who has recently landed in India. Soon they decide to make each moment count and live life to the fullest. However, one encounter with the cops changes their fate and the story turns into a revenge drama. As Advait goes on a killing spree, we meet Anjaney Agashe (Anil Kapoor) — a trigger-happy cop who believes in closing cases with his gun – and the yin to his yang, by-the-book policeman Michael Rodriguez (Kunal Kemmu). Soon after, everyone is killing everyone, and that’s about it.

The first half of the film is slow-paced and tries hard to establish a connect with the audience. For some reason, we don’t want to know why Advait is an introvert (if that’s what the makers intended to show) or why Sara wants to ‘seize the day’. Despite the fantastic chemistry between the two actors, their stories feel incomplete, and unnecessary at times. Sexual violence and male commitment phobia are ascribed to traumatic childhoods and women exist only to be raped, take revenge or be the motivation for revenge.

Kemmu stays at simmer, raising the acting bar even in scenes with the usually enjoyable Anil as the senior cop is good but not extraordinary. He brings a fine balance between being over-the-top and flamboyant. Aseem Arora’s script puts both these tracks on a collision course. The sight is not pretty, though fortunately, the locations of Goa, Mauritius and the very attractive Disha Patani make up somewhat for bends in the road. Aditya Roy Kapoor hits his mark as the bearded, muscular, angry young man glowering under a hood. But, as the younger version of Advait, he remains a cardboard character.

The move is pulled down because of it’s weak premise and jumping screenplay. Though if you ask me in his career graph there is an improvement for the director Mohit Suri ( I am personally not a big fan of his movies) , if I have to name two of his best movies then can only think of Awaraapan and Malang ( best among the worst ).

One thing that I particularly liked in the film is how each character has a fairly convincing back-story justifying their actions and reactions onscreen. Also, what stands out apart from some nice location and well shot scenes is the music of the film which is quiet good ( one thing which Suri has learned well from his mentor – Bhat Sahab; Music of all his films always stands out ). Overall the only reason to watch this thriller is the performances and good music else can be skipped for a Netflix premier.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: